Tag: Hacker

Pros and cons of mobile tokens in authentication

I recently discussed the future of the online banking industry and how the FFEIC should shape its next set of guidelines to ensure the safety of both banks and their customers in the years ahead. However, one area which I didn’t explore in that post is the mobile platform, and the role it has to play […]

Just another word or two – passphrases vs passwords

We have blogged many miles of space about the dangers of protecting your business assets with a simple username and password solution. Now there is a new trend using passphrases as a beefed up type of authentication. The problem is, there’s not much meat to this solution. Passphrases are basically a group of dictionary words […]

The Hacker War – It’s time to get proactive

When it comes to computer hackers going after corporate data networks, “we’re not winning,” FBI executive assistant director Shawn Henry told Devlin Barrett of the Wall Street Journal last week. The comment is true, considering that 2011 brought us 535 breaches, with 30.4 million sensitive records involved.  The biggest breaches included Sony, Epsilon and NASDAQ.  […]

The curious case of Felix Roque: Hacking for Dummies

Felix Roque, mayor of a New Jersey town (West New York) just minutes from downtown Manhattan, was arrested May 25th for hacking into a website that posted less than flattering comments about him and his administration.  The now defunct site, www.recallroque.com, had been targeted by both Roque and his son, Joseph, since it was set […]

Twelve months of enterprising blogging

Today the Gemalto Enterprise blog celebrates its first anniversary. Since the birth of the Enterprise Blog on August 30th 2011, we’ve given our view on many of the biggest stories in the world of enterprise security and authentication. These have included everything from passwords to privacy, and Google to Genesis. Having shared so many of […]

The Myth of the “Strong” Password

Which password do you think is easier for a hacker to crack – “Th3r3 can only b3 #1!” or “Hammered asinine requirements”? According to some new research from Carnegie Mellon University’s Institute for Software Research, it’s actually the former that is the weaker password.  Why?  Because the password “Th3r3 can only b3 #1!” has grammatical […]